Unforgettable images of Australian mateship in war.

Lest We Forget.

The Battle of the Pimple was part of the Markham and Ramu Valley – Finisterre Range campaign, and was fought by Australian and Japanese soldiers in Papua New Guinea in WW2 on the 27th and 28th of December 1943.

A wounded Australian is led towards medical attention. The wounded soldier, Corporal Merv Hall, later received the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his actions during the assault.

The image came from the Australian War Memorial and is in the public domain. The image file number is AWM 062294.

A digger carries a wounded comrade down to a dressing station near North Beach, Gallipoli, in 1915.

The image came from the Australian War Memorial and is in the public domain. The image file number is AWM G00599.

Peter Barnes created a painting based on this photograph. To see the painting click on the ‘Australian Paintings’ link in Articles at the top of this webpage.

During the advance on Salamaua, in Papua New Guinea, Sergeant Gordon Ayre MM, a 58/59th Battalion bandsman from Shepparton, Victoria, in pouring rain assists a wounded mate, Private Wally Johnson, of the same unit, across Franscisco Creek to an advanced regimental aid post.

Johnson had been wounded by a Japanese grenade on the 13th of July 1943, during an attack.

Sergeant Ayre was awarded the military medal for his performance during this action.

The image came from the Australian War Memorial and is in the public domain. The image file number is AWM 127971.

An Australian soldier, who lost both his legs, being carried into Australia House in London in 1919 to obtain a position of vantage to view the Anzac Day March through the streets.

The image came from the Australian War Memorial and is in the public domain. The image file number is AWM H18643.

The photo is of Lance Corporal Claude Alexander Porter, 3rd Reinforcements, 20th Battalion, of Wellington, NSW (He is on the left) and an unidentified soldier. His unit operated on the Western Front for some time before moving to the area known as Hangard Wood near Villers-Bretonneux, where they established three posts in the front of the main front line.

On the 15th of April 1918, Lance Corporal Porter was sent on a patrol of the area during which he came upon a German officer and two men and succeeded in capturing them, although they escaped during a stiff fire fight which had begun. Porter returned to one of the three posts which had been established but was killed in action when all three posts were over run by the Germans.

Lance Corporal Porter is buried in the Military Cemetery at Villers-Bretonneux, France.

The image came from the Australian War Memorial and is in the public domain. The image file number is AWM P04094.001.

The photograph is included in the video ‘You Never Came Home’. It is a remembrance video for all the Australians who died on the Western Front. To watch the video you can go to Peter Barnes’ ANZAC Day website.  There is a link to this website at the bottom of this article. 

Australian soldiers helping a wounded mate in the Vietnam War in Phuoc Tuy Province in 1966.

The image came from the Australian War Memorial and is in the public domain. The image file number is AWM COA/66/0877/VN.

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Very famous photograph taken on the 30th of July 1943 of Corporal Leslie (Bull) Allen MM, aged 26 of Ballarat, Victoria, carrying out a wounded American soldier down the slopes of Mount Tambu, New Guinea, during the Wau – Salamaua campaign.  One of 12 he retrieved. 

He was awarded the US Silver Star and had already received his Military Medal (MM) on the 7th of February 1943, at Crystal Creek, Wau. He was born in Ballarat in 1916 and died in Ballarat in 1982. 

The 4th of July 2018, marked the 100th anniversary of the first time Australian and American troops fought side by side in an offensive action, at the Battle of Hamel on France’s Western Front. 

The image came from the Australian War Memorial and is in the public domain. The image file number is AWM 015515.

Peter Barnes was born in Ballarat in 1953 and created a painting based on this photograph.  To see the painting click on the ‘Australian Paintings’ link in Articles at the top of this webpage.

Click on the image above to go to the website for the Australian War Heroes Song ‘Can You Hear Australia’s Heroes Marching?’. Peter authored the song in 2001.  You can download the song for FREE on this website.  You can also buy music sheets for the song. 

It is a national war memorial song and a tribute to the ANZAC spirit of mateship, courage and sacrifice.

Over 100,000 Australians have lost their lives in the service and defence of our country. Along with their mates, they’re marching once again, in the towns and cities, across our great land.

The song is timeless and honours the memory of those who have died in the service and defence of Australia in war. The marching theme of the song is especially powerful and supports the spirit of ANZAC Day.

The song does not glorify war or endorse conflict of any kind. The song simply highlights the sacrifice of many Australians who died in the service and defence of our country in war.

The song has been used for commemorative purposes across Australia by schools, churches, choirs, bands, councils, retirement homes, military services, radio stations, RSL branches and ANZAC tributes at NRL & AFL matches.

The song is also requested to be used at veteran funerals.  The song is suitable for ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day.

Click on the image above to go to the website for the Australian War Heroes Song ‘Can You Hear Australia’s Heroes Marching?’. Peter authored the song in 2001.

Click on the image above to go to the ANZAC Day website to see the remembrance video ‘You Never Came Home’.